From the “Nazi Gold Train” to Industry 4.0

There is a lot of buzz about industry 4.0 and digitization, but in many industries, its implementation is simply impossible at present. There are no solutions that allow non-invasive, quick and cheap research of what is below us.

 

Is it true that the company’s history began with the famous “Nazi Gold Train”?

Andrzej Kułak, DSc, Scientific Leader of the Project: Yes, indeed. The idea of building a new type of GPR had already matured, however, the heated discussions of geophysicists about the possibility of seeing a buried train assured us it’s time to act. It was difficult to free yourself of the question, what would the new GPR say in such a situation? Studies and physical modelling of the new GPR echo propagation have shown new possibilities for sub-surface penetration. Also, the development of radio technology has allowed the construction of a lightweight, portable structure, unattainable a few years ago. Finally, opportunity to create an extremely competent team to implement the idea was an extremely favourable circumstance that led to the establishment of the company.

Mirosław Trześniowski, CEO and Business Development Leader: I had the opportunity to talk to representatives of the oil, construction and mining industries. Everyone signalled that there was a lack of solutions giving quick and precise information about the subsurface. There is a lot of buzz about industry 4.0 and digitization, but in many industries, its implementation is simply impossible at present. There are no solutions that allow non-invasive, quick and cheap research of what is below us.

 

What makes your idea stand out from the competition?

AK: Available GPRs work on a completely different principle. Our Spectral GPR (SGPR) continuously penetrates the subsurface space in a very wide range of frequencies. It allows the analysis of radio images, which can be compared to colour vision in the optical range. It facilitates the measurement of physical parameters of the substrate and spatial imaging of technical infrastructure located underground. Innovative solutions mean that the speed of collecting data on the ground, with high resolution, increased signal to noise ratio, depth range and low transmission power, significantly surpasses the possibilities of existing solutions.

 

Where can SGPR technology be used and which industries will benefit the most from its implementation?

MT: The main beneficiary of our technology will be construction industry, not only because in the European Union alone it is responsible for 9% of GDP, but also because we will be able to provide a highly disruptive tool. From the bidding stage, design to the construction and maintenance of infrastructure, our device will enable precise, non-invasive and cheap subsurface modelling. The same is true for mining, where we can support many processes and improve safety. In the oil and gas industry, SGPR will provide critical information about the near subsurface for seismic exploration purposes. Today, it remains unrecognized by seismic methods, which generates significant business risk.